Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Meet the Awardee: 2019 Pink Ribbon

Posted By on July 11th, 2019 at 4:18 pm | 0 comments.

Robin Shine-Maddox, Pink Ribbon Awardee

This year, the PA Breast Cancer Coalition honors breast cancer survivor and advocate, Robin Shine-Maddox, with our Pink Ribbon Award. Founder and President of Celebrating Sisterhood and Chief Networking Officer of SHINE CONNECTIONS LLC., Robin has been a fearless leader and motivator in the fight against breast cancer in the Philadelphia area. Since being diagnosed at age 55, Robin, who also serves as Constituent Activity Liaison for State Senator Vincent Hughes, has been a voice of strength and survivorship within her community. In addition to her public work to raise breast cancer awareness, promote early detection practices and help other women find the resources they need, Robin’s message to survivors is one of solidarity, hope and faith.

Meet the Awardee: 2019 Potamkin Prize

Posted By on July 11th, 2019 at 4:13 pm | 0 comments.

Dr. Gabriel N. Hortobagyi, Potamkin Prize Winner

2019 Potamkin Prize Winner, Dr. Gabriel N. Hortobagyi, MD, FACP, is a longtime trailblazer in the field of breast cancer research and oncology. As Professor of Medicine in the Department of Breast Medical Oncology at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Hortobagyi’s major area of focus is the biology and treatment of breast cancer and the development of new agents and management strategies for the disease. He  has guest edited numerous issues of Seminars in Oncology, Seminars if Breast Disease, Oncology, and The Cancer Bulletin. For over three decades, Hortobagyi has dedicated his life’s work to improving the lives of breast cancer patients. He has focused overcoming resistance to endocrine therapy by developing rational combinations of endocrine therapies with targeted therapies. His work has changed the standard of care in managing metastatic, hormone receptor-positive breast cancer.groundbreaking research and ultimately, finding a cure.

 

Palliative Care: The Facts on this Specialty Supportive Service

Posted By on July 1st, 2019 at 11:06 am | 0 comments.

 

 

David R. Wenner, DO FAAFP

Chief Medical Officer, Hospice of Central PA

 

Palliative care is a medical specialty that focuses on relief of physical, emotional, physiological and spiritual symptoms related to chronic and/or serious illness. Often, symptoms such as pain, anxiety, insomnia, shortness of breath, fatigue, nausea, and appetite loss can significantly impact a patient’s quality of life. Palliative medicine specialists aim to reduce the burden of these symptoms by focusing on individualized treatment strategies, addressing the “Whole Patient” and not just the disease process.

 

Palliative care includes a specialized team of physicians, nurses, social workers, and chaplains. We work alongside the patient, family, and other medical providers as a team. Specialists in palliative care see patients in hospitals, in their offices, in long term care facilitates, as well as in their homes.

Palliative care is NOT the same as hospice care. Palliative care may be provided at any time during a person’s illness. Often, palliative care is offered to patients at the same time they are receiving potentially life prolonging or curative treatments. Receiving palliative care does not prevent the patient from pursuing other services, treatments, or procedures.

Another goal of palliative care is to help patients and families better understand their illness in order to assist with complex medical decision making. We strive for a patient’s values and goals to be heard and appreciated so that they can make the best decision possible for their care.

A referral to a Palliative Medicine physician does not mean your medical provider is “giving up hope.” Often, patients who receive palliative care early on in their disease process benefit from superior symptom management, greater emotional support, and overall improved quality of life.

 

Palliative ( pal-ee-uh-tiv)

Adj. intended to alleviate a problem. Synonyms: soothing, alleviating, calmative.

 

 

AARP’s CARE Act Provides Support to Caregivers

Posted By on June 28th, 2019 at 10:52 am | 0 comments.

 

More than 1.6 million Pennsylvanians care for older parents, spouses or other loved ones, helping them to live independently at home. These family caregivers have a huge responsibility, and PA now has a law that will make life a little bit easier for them.

The CARE (Caregiver Advise, Record, Enable) Act helps family caregivers when their loved ones go into the hospital and as they transition home.

The CARE Act requires hospitals to:

  • Provide your loved one the opportunity to designate a family caregiver.
  • Inform you when your loved one is to be discharged to another facility or back home.
  • Give you an explanation and demonstration of the medical tasks you will need to perform at home.

“AARP is here in PA fighting for older Americans and their families said Joanne Grossi, PA State President AARP and Executive Vice President, PA Breast Cancer Coalition.  Because of the work of AARP, the CARE Act is now a reality for all Pennsylvanians. This crucial law gives essential information and support to caregivers, including families who are facing a breast cancer diagnosis and living with metastatic disease.  Caregiving is a big responsibility, and caregivers should have the important information that they need to safely care for their loved ones at home.”

 

 

AARP Pennsylvania led the fight in PA for the CARE Act. To see the full release please click here:  https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/pennsylvanias-care-act-takes-effect-april-20-300441932.html.

Vitamin D Linked to Longer Breast Cancer Survival

Posted By on December 2nd, 2016 at 7:38 am | 0 comments.

vitamin-d-photo-2-with-ribbonResearchers say breast cancer patients with higher levels of Vitamin D have higher survival rates, especially premenopausal women. The study, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association Oncology, used date from more than 1,500 hundred survivors over the course of 7 years. During that time, women with vitamin D levels over 25 nanograms had a 28 percent higher likelihood of surviving when compared to women with levels under 17 nanograms.

Scientists say higher vitamin D levels had an even stronger impact on premenopausal women. The study considered many factors including the tumor stage, grade and type.

The Institute of Medicine recommends 600 units of vitamin D daily for people under 70 and 800 for people over 70.

To read the entire New York Times article on the study, click here.

PA Breast Cancer Coalition: Shift in Mammography Screening Guidelines Confusing to Women

Posted By on October 20th, 2015 at 5:59 pm | 0 comments.

50532286-1
PENNSYLVANIA –
The American Cancer Society (ACS) today released new, weakened breast cancer screening guidelines, changing the recommended age for women to begin yearly mammograms to age 45 and every two years after age 55. Previously, the guidelines suggested annual mammograms beginning at age 40 for average risk women.

American Cancer Society Breast Cancer Guidelines – published 10/20/15 

  • Women with an average risk of breast cancer – most women – should begin yearly mammograms at age 45.
  • Women should be able to start the screening as early as age 40, if they want to. It’s a good idea to start talking to your health care provider.
  • At age 55, women should have mammograms every other year – though women who want to keep having yearly mammograms should be able to do so.
  • Regular mammograms should continue as long as a woman is in good health.
  • Breast exams, either from a medical provider or self-exams, are no longer recommended.

The American Cancer Society bases its shift in suggested age and frequency on the occurrence of false positives/false alarms. The PA Breast Cancer Coalition (PBCC) cautions women in Pennsylvania on these latest, more confusing guidelines.

“This is a step in the wrong direction,” said PA Breast Cancer Coalition President and Founder Pat Halpin-Murphy. “Most women we speak with would prefer to have a second mammogram or an ultrasound rather than to find cancer at a later, less treatable stage. The advent of 3D mammograms will alleviate much of the ACS’s concern over false positives since 3D mammograms reduce false alarms by 27 percent and increase early detection by 20 percent. The PBCC continues to recommend mammograms for women beginning at age 40 for the average woman until a more perfect test is developed.”

Pennsylvania law requires insurers to cover the cost of all mammograms once a year for women beginning at age 40. Governor Tom Wolf, First Lady Frances Wolf and the PBCC announced earlier this month that 3D mammograms are covered under the same law for women insured in Pennsylvania effective immediately.

About the PA Breast Cancer Coalition

The PBCC represents, supports and serves breast cancer survivors and their families in Pennsylvania through educational programming, legislative advocacy and breast cancer research grants.  The PBCC is a statewide non-profit organization dedicated to finding a cure now…so our daughters won’t have to.  For more information, please call 800-377-8828 or visit www.PABreastCancer.org.

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March 3 is Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Day

Posted By on February 25th, 2015 at 3:16 pm | 1083 comments.

woman-with-doctorMarch 3 is Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Day. Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a very aggressive form of the disease which makes up for 15 to 20 percent of all breast cancer cases. Pennsylvania researchers, like Refunds for Research grant winners Dr. Mauricio Reginato of Drexel University College of Medicine, Dr. Yanming Wang of Penn State University and Dr. Sandra Fernandez of Thomas Jefferson University Hospitals are just a few of the scientists in Pennsylvania working every day to find out what causes triple-negative breast cancer and what we need to cure it.

Researchers at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida will be conducting clinical trials on a vaccine they believe could prevent triple-negative breast cancer from coming back after a patient has been treated.

Here is the complete text from a recent USA Today article on the topic:

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — A major breakthrough could be coming for patients who suffer from a particularly aggressive type of breast cancer commonly referred to as “triple negative.”

Researchers at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville are planning to do clinical trials for a vaccine that would hopefully prevent the disease from coming back after a patient has been treated.

“Can we do something else to essentially wake up the immune system so that the patient’s own body fights any cancer cells remaining after standard chemotherapy treatment?” asked Dr. Edith Perez, lead researcher on the project at Mayo Clinic.

Triple-negative breast cancer, or TNBC, strikes 15 percent to 20 percent of breast cancer patients. Unlike most forms of breast cancer, it’s not fueled by estrogen and cannot be treated with estrogen blockers like Tamoxifen. Right now, the only treatment is chemotherapy and the disease, even when treated, is likely to come back and spread.

TNBC typically strikes younger patients than most other forms of breast cancer. It often occurs in women under 50. African-American and Hispanic women are also more likely to develop it as are women who have the BRCA1 gene mutations.

Donna Deegan, a WTLV- and WJXX-TV news anchor, is a three-time breast cancer survivor. She was diagnosed with the cancer at age 38.

“For women with triple negative breast cancer, if this works, it could be a game changer,” Deegan said.

Perez said that in the past, she was not optimistic about the chances for success of a breast cancer vaccine. However, that has now changed.

“Over the last year we spent quite a bit of time evaluating a protein that is called the folate receptor alpha protein. We studied it in a variety of tumor types here in the laboratory at Mayo and we identified that in approximately 80% of the cases of triple negative breast cancer, this protein was over-expressed.” said Dr. Perez. “Patients who will be eligible are those patients with resected or removed triple negative breast cancer whose tumors express this protein.”

Perez is one of the top breast cancer researchers in the world. She teamed with immunologist Dr. Keith Knutson to develop the vaccine. Knutson’s research has worked on treatments for both ovarian and breast cancer. Patients who are part of the trial will be treated over a six-month period.

Funding for this research comes from several sources, including money raised by a local marathon. Perez said it will take about $10 million to complete the vaccine clinical trial.

“I tell you, the marathon has been instrumental to all of this work we have done over the years because we didn’t have a genomics program here at Mayo Clinic before the marathon started. So we used the funds to start the program,” Perez said.

The PBCC is hiring a Full-time Fundraising Coordinator

Posted By on December 23rd, 2013 at 2:44 pm | 168 comments.

Full-time Fundraising Coordinator Needed!

The PA Breast Cancer Coalition is seeking a highly motivated, experienced fundraiser with excellent development and proven money raising skills to work full-time in the Lebanon, PA office.

 This position provides an opportunity for an exciting, challenging and rewarding career.  This person is responsible for the overall fundraising efforts of the organization.  He/she will have the ability to organize and manage multiple fundraising projects under deadlines and interact well with all levels of staff, board and volunteers.

Duties include, but are not limited to:

   Fundraising:

  • – identify, cultivate and solicit new corporate donors
  • – identify, cultivate and solicit new major donor prospects
  • – research, apply to and submit full grant proposals to corporate, pharmaceutical and foundation funders
  • – develop and maintain relationships with large donors and foundations
  • – coordinate Conference and Home Run derby sponsorships
  • – create and execute the annual appeal and other fundraising appeals
  • – create a planned giving program

 Requirements/Qualifications

  • – Bachelor’s degree
  • – Three or more years of professional fundraising or related experience
  • – A demonstrated ability and proven track record in major and corporate gifts along with the proven record of raising money from corporations and grant makers
  • – Previous corporate, pharmaceutical and/or foundation grant writing experience
  • – Highly organized with the ability to multi-task and work productively in a team setting
  • – Willingness to travel within PA and attend occasional evening and weekend events
  • – Excellent oral and written communication skills
  • – Comfort using Microsoft Office suite

 

 Salary Range

This is a full-time, 40 hour per week position, offering a comprehensive benefits package and a competitive non-profit salary. Salary is dependent on education and experience.

 

Please submit the following to Jobs@PABreastCancer.org with “Fundraising Coordinator” in the subject line.

  • – Cover letter with information on previous fundraising successes
  • – Resume
  • – Required salary range

No phone calls please.  The PA Breast Cancer Coalition is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

 

This position is funded through October 31, 2015 with an excellent possibility of re-funding.

 

 The PA Breast Cancer Coalition (PBCC) represents, supports and serves breast cancer survivors and their families in Pennsylvania through educational programming, legislative advocacy and breast cancer research grants. The PBCC is a statewide organization with a board of directors and a network of volunteers across the state. The PBCC exists to help the 9,500 women in this state who will be diagnosed with breast cancer this year, to support the families of the 2,200 women who will die from it and to serve as a resource for the hundreds of thousands more women currently living with the disease.