“Let’s Get This Party Started” Fearless Philadelphia Breast Cancer Survivor Faces New Battle

Posted By on February 2nd, 2018 at 9:20 am | 0 comments.

 

Glynis Rhodes, Philadelphia
Diagnosed in 2007

HOW WAS YOUR BREAST CANCER FOUND?
That was with a regular annual mammogram in 2007. I had a lumpectomy and chemo and radiation. I’d been doing well until October 22, 2017 when I diagnosed with uterine cancer which we think may have been a result of some of the chemotherapy drugs. I’m back in chemo but this time it will be every week for 18 weeks with lower doses of chemo. That’ll be better on my body, easier to tolerate. With both diagnoses, whatever the doctor said … boom, boom, boom, I said let’s get this party started.

WHO SUPPORTED YOU THROUGH YOUR JOURNEY?
I had all the support in the world! My mother came and stayed with me for nine months, which was one of the best times of my entire life. We were always close, but being a grown-up and having my mother take care of me made me fall in love with her all over again. My Jehovah’s Witness congregation and my friends not only brought food and treats but also flowers for my mom. They would come and sit with me so she could go out and still do things like get her hair done. The staff at Hahnemann Hospital was phenomenal. I’ve been with them for ten years now and they’ve become like family. When I got my chemo schedule I sent it out and I have a different person going to each appointment from January through April with me.

WHEN DID YOU FIRST KNOW ABOUT THE PBCC?
The oncology social worker at the hospital put me in touch with Living Beyond Breast Cancer and some of the women I met there introduced me to the PA Breast Cancer Coalition. My first PBCC conferences were in 2016 and 2017 and I received scholarships both years. I wouldn’t have been able to come otherwise. The first year I wore a little pink and black tutu to the Pink Party and I won the costume contest!

TELL US WHAT YOU LIKED MOST ABOUT THE CONFERENCE.
The speakers were knowledgeable but presented the information in a way that wasn’t over your head. There were topics you could use in your everyday life. I could go home and feel like I absorbed everything and would be able to share it.

WHAT ADVICE DO YOU GIVE OTHER WOMEN?
It’s important to talk and it’s important to listen. Do not let anyone rob you of how you feel and don’t let anyone else put their story on you. We need to watch what we say to one another. My hair never grew back and every once in a while someone will say that it’s the style now. I don’t want to hear that it’s the style. When it’s not your choice, it’s not a style. And don’t tell me I have a beautiful head. I want hair on top of it like yours.

DO YOU HAVE ADVICE FOR SOMEONE WHOSE FRIEND OR LOVED ONE IS DIAGNOSED?
It’s not rocket science but you can move mountains when you try. If you’re miles away, send them a card to let them know you’re there for them. Or send them a little gift card that they can use to put gas in their car. I even needed people to read to me because one of the medications made my eyes too watery to read. A little tenderness and thoughtfulness will go a long way.

WHAT IF THE PBCC DIDN’T EXIST?
People would die. Plain and simple. You offer lifesaving programs and information about mammograms and coverage for treatment that people wouldn’t even know about otherwise.

Comments are closed.