Archive for the ‘Refunds for Breast Cancer Research’ Category

Every Dollar Counts. Join our Fight to Find a Cure this Tax Season!

Posted By on December 16th, 2013 at 8:30 am | 1903 comments.

Researcher-in-Lab-Wistar-Image-for-webDid you know your Pennsylvania state income tax refund can directly help to find a cure for breast cancer?  It can, and we believe it will.  Each year, the PA Breast Cancer Coalition awards grants to breast cancer researchers working to find the cause of and cure for cancer within the state through its Refunds for Research program.  How can you help?  It’s simple…

To donate,  look for Line 32 on the PA-40 tax form and list the amount of your state refund you would like to donate directly to breast cancer research.  Every penny of the money raised through Refunds for Research will fund projects in Pennsylvania.  More than $3 million has been raised since the program’s inception in 1997, but the need for funding and support is still great.  Your tax dollars today can make an impact on generations to come.  Consider donating a portion of your state income tax refund to breast cancer research.
For more information on the Refunds for Research program, click here.

Dr. Meyers’ Research Continues

Posted By on December 17th, 2012 at 8:01 am | 440 comments.


Last year, the PBCC presented Dr. Craig Meyers, a cancer researcher at Penn State Hershey Medical Center, with a $100,000 grant to further his promising research into a virus that kills breast cancer cells.  The PBCC also funded Dr. Meyers’ initial research on the virus through a PBCC Refunds for Research grant. We checked in with Dr. Meyers to get an update on his progress. The following is what Dr. Meyers had to say about his work:

“We have been finishing up our first mouse breast cancer study and manuscript, and are pleased to report that the results have been better than expected. The data shows that the same mechanisms used by the virus that killed triple-negative breast cancer cells in vitro (in a petri dish sample) also appear to kill triple-negative breast cancer cells in our living mouse sample as well. There is still a large public interest. I still get calls and emails weekly requesting updates, looking for hope, and providing encouragement to carry on.

Our current challenge is obtaining the additional funds necessary to move toward clinical testing, either from the federal government or a private organization. In the meantime, the response of smaller groups and individuals to organize fundraisers and provide donations to keep this research moving forward has been overwhelming. If not for the support of the PA Breast Cancer Coalition and numerous others, we would have been forced to stop work on this study a year ago. We will spend the remainder of the year applying for additional funds from the National Institute of Health. We just need to continue our efforts using what resources we have available. We are still excited about the results we have obtained and dedicated to do what we can to keep the research moving forward.”

PBCC President and Founder Pat Halpin-Murphy responds to breakthrough breast cancer study

Posted By on September 24th, 2012 at 2:38 pm | 768 comments.

Researchers have unveiled what they believe is a hallmark study for breast cancer patients and the doctors who treat them. Their findings, published Sunday in the journal Nature and the New York Times, are expected to pave the way for new treatment options in the coming years.

The project, funded by a larger federal grant, focused on a genetic analysis of breast cancer, which kills more than 12,000 women in Pennsylvania each year.  The scientists monitored the tumors of 825 breast cancer patients in the US. As a result, they found four distinctive types of breast cancer. Within those types, researchers say they identified at least 40 genetic alterations that might be attacked by drugs. Many of those drugs are already being developed for other types of cancers with the same mutations.

Researchers and patient advocates stress that it could still take years of research and clinical trials to incorporate the insights into new treatments. They say a wide variety of drugs will most likely need to be created and tailored to individual tumor types.

“This is a tremendous new development that will alter the way women with breast cancer are treated,” said PBCC President and Founder Pat Halpin-Murphy. “Of course, this is the first step, but I believe it’s the first step toward a cure for many types of breast cancer.”

The four types identified in the study are basal-like cancers, luminal A and B cancers, and HER2-enriched cancers. From here, doctors and researchers are hoping clinical trials and dozens of separate drug studies will help to develop new breakthroughs in treatment from the findings. Dr. Elizabeth Stark, a breast cancer patient and biochemist at Pfizer, says she knows it will take time, but she’s hopeful the research will lead to a cure. “In 10 years, it will be different,” she said. “I know I will be here in 10 years.”

To read the complete New York Times Article, visit this link: NY Times Article

To read the complete journal Nature study, visit this link: journal Nature study

The PA Breast Cancer Coalition represents, supports and serves breast cancer survivors and their families in Pennsylvania through educational programming, legislative advocacy and breast cancer research grants. The PBCC is a statewide non-profit organization dedicated to finding a cure now…so our daughters won’t have to. For more information, please call 800-377-8828 or visit www.PABreastCancer.org.

Summer edition of FrontLine now available online

Posted By on June 22nd, 2012 at 9:27 am | 1866 comments.

Take a read through our summer edition of FrontLine, our quarterly newsletter. If you would like to register for the 2012 Conference, to sign up for the Take a Swing Against Breast Cancer home run derby, or to find out more about our Grassroots Partners, take a browse through our site!

Cambridge Study Could Lead to Tailored Treatment

Posted By on May 15th, 2012 at 10:32 am | 179 comments.

Using data gathered through analysis of the genetic makeup of a tumor, a new study could lead to tailored treatment for those battling breast cancer. This groundbreaking study would reclassify the disease into 10 new categories or subtypes, giving doctors information to make better treatment recommendations and helping patients avoid unnecessary treatment. This is exciting news for the PBCC and all those we serve, as it could revolutionize treatment of breast cancer and give many women better outcomes with fewer side effects.

The Cambridge study, which is the largest genetic study of breast cancer to date, has been heralded as a step toward individualizing treatment for patients, allowing many to avoid treatment that would be less likely to benefit them. The next step in the process is establishing clinical trials. Within three to five years, doctors may be able to start development of more accurate diagnostic tests.

The PBCC is impressed with the results of the study and encouraged that tailored, more individualized breast cancer therapy may become a reality but, of course, clinical trials must be conducted first.

Refunds for Breast Cancer Research Kick-Off at Capitol

Posted By on April 13th, 2012 at 8:59 am | 750 comments.

Donate Your State Income Tax Refund Today

The PBCC presented Allan Lipton, M.D. of the Penn State College of Medicine with a $50,000 grant at a kick-off event for the 2012 Refunds for Breast and Cervical Cancer Research Campaign at the Capitol Building. Michael Wolf , Executive Deputy Secretary at the PA Department of Health, and Debbie Freer, a breast cancer survivor and PBCC Board Member joined PBCC President & Founder Pat Halpin-Murphy in speaking at the event.

Dr. Lipton was one of three Pennsylvania researchers chosen to receive a research grant this year through the PBCC’s Refunds for Breast and Cervical Cancer Research program. His research centers on metastases and whether a biomarker can be found in blood to help doctors determine which of two FDA-approved therapies would be more effective in treating the patient. The two other researchers – Andy Minn, M.D., Ph.D. and Takemi Tanaka, Ph.D. – were presented with their grants at an event held at Philadelphia City Hall in February.

With only days left to file your taxes, be sure to check yes on line 35 of your PA state income tax form to donate all or part of your refund to the PBCC’s Refunds for Research program.

Spring 2012 edition of FrontLine

Posted By on March 28th, 2012 at 11:56 am | 493 comments.

By now, if you’re on our mailing list, you should have received the latest edition of FrontLine. The PBCC sends out this print newsletter every quarter to let you know what we’re up to across the state and how YOU can get involved!

Take a read through our online edition and share it with your friends!

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President’s Corner: How Your Dollars Make a Difference with Refunds for Research

Posted By on March 16th, 2012 at 8:58 am | 321 comments.

Contributing to potentially groundbreaking research is as easy as checking a box on your PA state income tax form, thanks to the PBCC’s Refunds for Breast and Cervical Cancer Research program. Every penny raised goes to fund grants to researchers working right here in the state. Join us on April 2 at the Capitol in Harrisburg for a press conference to present 2012 awardee Dr. Allan Lipton with a grant for $50,000.

Dr. Andy Minn and Dr. Takemi Tanaka were each presented with $50,000 awards at an event in Philadelphia’s City Hall in February. Last October, Dr. Craig Meyers, a previous Refunds for Research award recipient, announced the discovery of a virus that kills breast cancer cells – a groundbreaking discovery that could bring us closer to a cure than ever before.

Over $2.8 million has been raised through the PBCC’s Refunds for Research program thanks to the generosity of Pennsylvania’s taxpayers. You CAN make a difference. Help us reach $3 million this year – look for line 35 on your PA state income tax form and donate all or part of your PA state income tax refund to the PBCC’s Refunds for Breast and Cervical Cancer Research.