Archive for the ‘Refunds for Breast Cancer Research’ Category

Choose Line 32, Choose HOPE: Make a Difference this Tax Day

Posted By on April 14th, 2016 at 12:17 pm | 0 comments.

patheadshotforplBy Pat Halpin-Murphy

You can help find a cure for breast cancer! This tax season is quickly coming to an end, but there’s still time. Donate your tax refund to the PA Breast Cancer Coalition’s Refunds for Research program. Simply go to Line 32 of your state income tax form and choose code “A” to donate.

Thanks to taxpayer contributions, foundations and generous individuals, this year the PBCC awarded four $50,000 grants to help researchers in their mission to find the cause of and cure for breast cancer.

Watch our video highlighting our grant winners below.


Are you a PA breast cancer researcher looking for funding?

Posted By on April 4th, 2016 at 9:56 am | 0 comments.

Applications are now being accepted for the PA Breast Cancer Coalition’s Breast Cancer Research Grants Initiative. Each year, the PBCC awards outstanding Pennsylvania researchers who are working to find a cure for breast cancer.

Click here for more information. 

3D Mammogram and Ultrasound: $50,000 Research Grant Winner Dr. Wendie Berg Examines Breast Cancer Screenings

Posted By on April 4th, 2016 at 9:41 am | 0 comments.

Study focused on effective screening techniques for women with dense tissue

Which is better at detecting breast cancer in women with dense breasts – an ultrasound or 3D mammogram? Dr. Wendie Berg, MD, PhD, FACR of the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and Magee-Womens Hospital of UPMC aims to answer that question with her PBCC-funded research.

The PA Breast Cancer Coalition awarded a $50,000 grant to Dr. Berg this week to continue her studies of the two breast cancer screenings. Dr. Berg is specifically interested in screenings for women with dense breasts. Dense breast tissue can hide cancer on a regular 2D mammogram, and often, supplemental screenings are recommended. It is a personal subject for Dr. Berg; her mother was diagnosed when she was in high school and Dr. Berg found her own breast cancer diagnosis through additional testing.

Dr. Berg and her team hope to deter3-30 check presmine if one of the options (ultrasound or 3D mammogram) are best in detecting breast cancer. On October 5, 2015, the PBCC awarded Dr. Berg an extraordinary opportunity grant of $50,000 to jump-start the process. Her study was also chosen to receive a 2016 grant through the PBCC Breast Cancer Research Grants Initiative – a fund comprised of taxpayer donations and private funding from anonymous donors and foundations.

Watch the video below to learn more about Dr. Berg’s breast cancer screening research.

Every Pennsylvania taxpayer has the option to donate their state income tax refund directly to our Research Initiative on Line 32. By choosing Code A, you join our fight to end breast cancer. Didn’t get a refund? Click here to donate now. Our goal in 2016 is to establish an endowment fund for research that enables us to continue our important mission of finding a cure for breast cancer now… so our daughters won’t have to.

President’s Corner – Marking a Research Milestone: PBCC Contributions to Penn State Hershey Reach $800,000

Posted By on March 15th, 2016 at 8:32 am | 0 comments.

patheadshotforplby Pat Halpin-Murphy, President and Founder
The PA Breast Cancer Coalition is incredibly proud to announce its total contributions to researchers at Penn State Hershey Cancer Institute have now reached $800,000!

Our latest grant winner, Dr. Edward Gunther, will use his $50,000 prize in 2016 to study the growth of cells over time and to examine why certain cell subsets develop into breast cancer. Dr. Gunther hopes to find key information about breast cancer prevention and to eventually develop a test or screening tool with the information his team finds.

A major portion of our Breast Cancer Research Grants Initiative comes from taxpayer donations.  This is where YOU have the opportunity to bring us closer to a cure. Look for Line 32 on your PA-40 state income tax form and choose Code A to donate your refund directly to Pennsylvania breast cancer researchers. The average donation is $7 and the PBCC has used those donations to award more than $3 million in grants to innovative projects across the state.  This tax season, donate your refund to life-saving breast cancer research!


You’re Invited: PBCC Awards $50,000 Research Grant to Dr. Edward Gunther!

Posted By on February 15th, 2016 at 9:13 am | 0 comments.

patheadshotforplWant to be a part of our fight to end breast cancer? Join the PA Breast Cancer Coalition as we award a $50,000 breast cancer research grant to Dr. Edward Gunther on Thursday, February 25 at 9:30am at Penn State Hershey Medical Center. Dr. Gunther is one of four winners in our 2016 Breast Cancer Research Grants Initiative. He plans to focus on the cause of breast cancer by investigating cells that go on to cause breast cancer.  Dr. Gunther and his team hope their studies will clarify whether this special subset of breast cells accumulates over time.  If so, the cells could become an important target for breast cancer prevention.

Working toward a cure is a goal YOU can help us achieve every year around this time. How? All Pennsylvania residents have a chance to provide hope for our future during tax season. Just choose code “A” on line 32 of the PA-40 state income tax form and every penny will go directly to innovative research going on right here in Pennsylvania. Thanks to those donations, we have awarded more than $3 million in grants to date!

We hope to see you Thursday, February 25 in Hershey!  Click here to RSVP.

Breast Cancer Researcher? Apply Now for a PBCC Research Grant!

Posted By on July 15th, 2015 at 11:09 am | 0 comments.

Dr.-Hua-Check-PresentationPennsylvania breast cancer researchers have life-changing ideas. The PA Breast Cancer Coalition wants to help them get those ideas off the ground. We are now accepting applications for the 2016 PA Breast Cancer Coalition Research Grant program. Each year, this program offers funding to cancer researchers in Pennsylvania working to find the cause of and cure for breast cancer as well as improved treatments. Letters of Intent are due July 29.

Want to apply?

The PBCC Research Grants program serves as a catalyst for scientists working every day on cutting-edge treatment ideas for women battling breast cancer.  Grants are awarded by a peer review panel of expert scientists and advocates.

If you are interested in applying, please fill out the application and budget forms on our website by clicking here.  If you have questions about our application process, contact or call 717-769-2308.  Thank you for working to find a cure for breast cancer now… so our daughters won’t have to!

Your Donations at Work: Penn State Hershey’s Dr. Craig Meyers Publishes Results of Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Study

Posted By on May 15th, 2015 at 8:30 am | 0 comments.

Dr-Meyers-and-BoardThe research of Dr. Craig Meyers and his team at Penn State College of Medicine, which was funded by the PA Breast Cancer Coalition, has been published in Cancer Biology and Therapy. They have determined that a virus not known to cause disease kills triple-negative breast cancer cells and killed tumors grown from these cells in mice. Understanding how the virus kills cancer may lead to new treatments for breast cancer.

Adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV2) infects humans but is not known to cause sickness. In prior studies, the researchers tested the virus on a variety of breast cancers that represent degrees of aggressiveness and on human papillomavirus-positive cervical cancer cells. The virus initiated apoptosis — natural cell death — in cancer cells without affecting healthy cells.
“Treatment of breast cancer remains difficult because there are multiple signaling pathways that promote tumor growth and develop resistance to treatment,” said Craig Meyers, Ph.D., Distinguished Professor of Microbiology and Immunology.
Signaling pathways involve molecules in a cell that control cell functions — like cell division — by cooperation. For example, the first molecule in the process receives a signal to begin. It then tells another molecule to work, and so on.
Treatment of breast cancer differs by patient due to differences in tumors. Some tumors contain protein receptors that are activated by the hormones estrogen or progesterone. Others respond to another protein called human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, or HER2. Each of these is treated differently.
A triple-negative breast cancer does not have any of these protein receptors and is typically aggressive.
“There is an urgent and ongoing need for the development of novel therapies which efficiently target triple-negative breast cancers,” Meyers said.
In the current study, the researchers tested AAV2 on a cell-line representative of triple-negative breast cancer. The researchers report their results in Cancer Biology & Therapy.
The AAV2 killed 100 percent of the cells in the laboratory by activating proteins called caspases, which are essential for the cell’s natural death. In addition, consistent with past studies, AAV2-infected cancer cells produced more Ki-67, an immunity system activating protein and c-Myc, a protein that helps both to increase cell growth and induce apoptosis. The cancer cell growth slowed by day 17 and all cells were dead by day 21. AAV2 mediated cell killing of multiple breast cancer cell lines representing both low and high grades of cancer and targeted the cancer cells independent of hormone or growth factor classification.
The researchers then injected AAV2 into human breast cancer cell line-derived tumors in mice without functioning immune systems. Mice that received AAV2 outlived the untreated mice and did not show signs of being sick, unlike the untreated mice. Tumor sizes decreased in the treated mice, areas of cell death were visible, and all AAV2 treated mice survived through the study, a direct contrast to the untreated mice.
“These results are significant, since tumor necrosis — or death — in response to therapy is also used as the measure of an effective chemotherapeutic,” Meyers said.
Future studies should look at the use of AAV2 body-wide in mice, which would better model what happens in humans.
Other researchers on this project are Samina Alam, research associate, Penn State; Brian Bowser, PPD Vaccines and Biologics Laboratory; Mohd Israr, Feinstein Institute for Medical Research; and Michael Conway, Central Michigan University College of Medicine.
The Pennsylvania Breast Cancer Coalition funded this research.

To read the complete article online, click here.


File your Taxes, Fight Breast Cancer: Penn Researcher Focused on HER2+ Breast Cancer Wins $50,000 PBCC Grant

Posted By on April 15th, 2015 at 8:39 am | 1846 comments.

patheadshotforplBy Pat Halpin-Murphy, President & Founder

You… yes, YOU can make a difference this time every year. I’m talking about the choices you make when filing your taxes. On Line 32, you can choose to donate your state income tax refund directly to breast cancer researchers in Pennsylvania who are working to find a cure. It’s part of the PBCC’s Refunds for Breast Cancer Research initiative.

Earlier this month, I had the pleasure of meeting Dr. Xianxin Hua, a researcher at the University of Pennsylvania Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute working on treatments for HER2+ breast cancer. The PBCC awarded Dr. Hua with a $50,000 grant to build progress and advancements in the lab. Dr. Hua is one of three grant winners this year. Drs. Alessandro Fatatis and Mauricio Reginato of the Drexel University College of Medicine also received Refunds for Research funding.

Maybe you already have made a difference this tax season. If you have, on behalf of the thousands of women and families touched by breast cancer, I thank you. You are providing hope and much-needed support for the brilliant minds at work in laboratories across the state!


YOU can make a real difference this tax season. Donate your state income tax refund to breast cancer research by choosing “Option A” on Line 32. Help us continue our fight against breast cancer! For more information on the PBCC’s Refunds for Research program, visit