Archive for the ‘Pink Link’ Category

Study Finds Third Gene Related to Breast Cancer

Posted By on August 15th, 2014 at 8:48 am | 0 comments.

ResearchersforwebThe two genes that have historically been linked with an increased risk of breast cancer are the BRCA1 and BRCA 2 genes.  Now, researchers at the University of Cambridge have found a third gene called PALB2 that raises the risk of breast cancer almost as much as BRCA1 and BRCA2.

Many genetic tests already check for the PALB2 gene, but it was unclear to what extent this gene increased the risk of breast cancer.  By age 70, women with BRCA1 mutations have a 50-70% chance of developing breast cancer and those with BRCA2 have a 40-60% chance.  If there is a mutation in the PALB2 gene, women have a 35% chance of developing breast cancer by age 70.

Research also found that women with the PALB2 gene have a slightly higher risk of developing triple-negative breast cancer, which is resistant to hormone treatment, more aggressive, and more likely to recur than other types of breast cancer.  Official guidelines do not recommend that women have genetic testing unless they have a family history, but the principal investigator on this new research, Dr. Marc Tischkowitz, said that, “such women should consider testing for PALB2 mutations if they are negative for BRCA1 and BRCA2.”

Read the complete New York Times article on this research: http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/07/health/gene-indicator-breast-cancer-risk.html?_r=0

Free Beach Vacations Available for Breast Cancer Survivors

Posted By on August 15th, 2014 at 8:48 am | 0 comments.

littlepinkhousesfamilyforwebLittle Pink Houses of Hope provides FREE week-long vacations for breast cancer patients and their families. Each beach retreat is designed to help families relax, reconnect, and rejuvenate. Families accepted are responsible for the cost of travel to and from the vacation site; all other aspects of the retreat are covered by Little Pink Houses of Hope.

Applications are now open for fall vacations in North Carolina, California, South Carolina and Florida. Each family is housed in their own beach housing which has a refrigerator stocked with all of their breakfast and drink needs.  Common meals are held for lunch and dinner, allowing families to meet and enjoy getting to know other families on the same journey.  During the week, a schedule of daily activities is put together based on local community donations.  In the past, activities have included, kayaking, hang gliding, stand up paddle boarding, golf, jewelry making classes, massage, fishing, sailing, concerts, carnivals, etc.
For more information on Little Pink Houses of Hope, visit the website: http://www.littlepink.org/

Giving Back and Celebrating Life with “Lori’s Loop”

Posted By on July 11th, 2014 at 12:51 pm | 0 comments.
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Survivor Lori Rhinehart, pictured here on the left with her daughter Brooke, hosts the annual Lori’s Loop 5K to benefit the PBCC

On February 26, 2009 I was diagnosed with breast cancer. It was a 1 cm. triple positive lump in my right breast.  Since then that 1 cm. has represented one biopsy, four surgeries, 35 radiation treatments, three scans, 17 Herceptin treatments, four chemo treatments, seven months of baldness, one bone scan, one bone marrow biopsy, countless sleepless nights, seven years of after-care medications, and 20 extra pounds.

The very same 1 cm. lump also represented the push I needed to celebrate life with a cruise to Bermuda and a trip to Germany, to quit smoking, to become a fundraiser and help others, to get healthy by working out and running, to gain a better appreciation of the love and support of my family and friends, and to check an item off my bucket list by organizing Lori’s Loop.

I learned about the PBCC when a friend ordered a Friends Like Me care package for me soon after I was diagnosed. Since then I’ve ordered many more of the friends boxes for others.

I stayed active and jogged a course while I was going through chemo and radiation treatment. I always thought, “One of these days I’ll organize a race and it’ll be on this exact space.” Last October I fulfilled that promise and held the first Annual Lori’s Loop 5K to benefit the PBCC. We had 100 runners which was a great turn-out for a first year event, and we raised $1,500 for the PBCC! We will do it again this year in Haines Acres in York.

I’ve learned to try to make the best of every day. You can’t really appreciate that until you come up against something that’s trying to take that away from you. This is it. You don’t get a reset button or a do-over. I switched jobs and am now working part-time, making a lot less money, and realizing I don’t need as much as I thought I did before. I’m enjoying my time with my husband Terry and my daughter Brooke Voloshin.

Study: 3-D Mammograms More Accurate in Detecting Invasive Breast Cancer

Posted By on July 11th, 2014 at 12:51 pm | 0 comments.
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Dr. Emily Conant, chief of breast imaging at the University of Pennsylvania Medical Center calls 3-D mammography “a big step forward.”

According to a new study, 3-D mammograms may be better at detecting invasive tumors and avoiding false alarms than regular mammograms alone.  Researchers studied data from 13 U.S. hospitals and found that 3D screenings increased breast cancer detection rates more than 40 percent.

The findings, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, also show a 15 percent decrease in women who had to return for further testing.  Right now, 3D mammograms are not covered by most insurance companies and typically cost an extra $50 – $100.  Researchers are hoping that will change in the future.  Doctors involved with the study say, after years of a one-size-fits-all approach, these findings could lead to more tailored recommendations for women.

For the complete article in the Philadelphia Inquirer, click here.

Register Now for the 2014 PA Breast Cancer Coalition Conference!

Posted By on July 10th, 2014 at 7:21 pm | 0 comments.

Conference2013PresidentsCornerforPLHave you been touched by breast cancer?  Maybe you’re a survivor or maybe you’re caring for one of the thousands of Pennsylvania woman who face this battle every day.  If you’re interested in learning the very latest in breast cancer research, treatments, advocacy, nutrition and survivorship, we invite you attend the PA Breast Cancer Coalition Conference on Monday, October 13, 2014 at the Harrisburg Hilton hotel.

Attend our many outstanding workshops, stroll through the exhibitor area, and spend the day with health professionals and other survivors who share our goal of finding a cure for breast cancer now… so our daughters won’t have to.

Early bird registration is now open online for $65.  Continuing Education Hours are also available for an additional fee.

Bring a friend and experience Pennsylvania’s premiere statewide breast cancer conference this fall!

WATCH: Click on the video below to learn more about the PA Breast Cancer Coalition Conference

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Click here to register for the 2014 PA Breast Cancer Coalition Conference!

Homers, High Fives & Heart: Harrisburg Kicks Off 2014 Home Run Derby Season

Posted By on June 16th, 2014 at 8:48 am | 0 comments.

Pat-June-Derby-pres-corner-picHundreds of batters and volunteers packed Metro Bank Park this part Tuesday to Take a Swing Against Breast Cancer® with the PA Breast Cancer Coalition.  Home runs were recorded and thousands of dollars were raised to strengthen our support network for breast cancer survivors, their families and caregivers across the state.  Not to mention, we had a blast!

With the help of our volunteers, batters and sponsors, the PBCC is able to provide women with the resources and comfort they need at a most difficult time in their lives.  There’s still time to join us and make a difference!  Our next stop is Lancaster at the home of Barnstormers baseball on Saturday, June 21.  Derby season wraps up Saturday, August 23 at Jerry Uht Park in Erie.  Knock one out of the park with us as we Take a Swing Against Breast Cancer this summer.

For scores from the Harrisburg home run derby, click here.

To check out our photos from the Harrisburg Home Run Derby, click here.

IN THE NEWS: Watch video clips from our first derby of the year

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Bradford County Survivor Finds Inner “Iron Lady”

Posted By on June 16th, 2014 at 8:46 am | 0 comments.
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Survivor Darci Baird smiles for a picture with her 2-year-old granddaughter Ava.

Darci Baird, Bradford County

Cancer is not a death sentence. I’ve learned that. The word is scary but it’s the word for a disease that can be beaten. You just have to face it, figure out your treatment plan, and go about the business of kicking cancer to the curb.

I was 49 years old in July 2009 when a routine mammogram found my breast cancer. I had a lumpectomy and then radiation and am now finishing up. This is my fifth year of taking Anastrazole (Arimidex).

I always thought I was strong but I learned just how strong I was, and how strong my faith was. I am 100% positive that I had the help of Christ to get me through breast cancer. I wouldn’t have come through without the prayers of so many people.
During one of my many office visits after diagnosis I saw some literature and I asked Helen Harshbarger if she thought the PBCC was worth my time. Helen said the PBCC is absolutely the grassroots organization you want to become connected to. I ordered a Friends Like Me care package for myself and getting all that wonderful information really solidified all the good things that Helen had told me.
Two years ago Robert Packer Hospital and Guthrie Healthcare were getting ready to host “67 Women 67 Counties: Facing Breast Cancer in Pennsylvania” and they asked me to help with that. That was a great experience.
About that time the movie Iron Lady about Margaret Thatcher came out. We decided to do a fundraiser with the theme that anyone who has survived breast cancer is an iron lady, so we put together the Iron Ladies Night Out. We had a commemorative stone inscribed for iron ladies past and present and laid it in front of the theatre in Sayre. We had the help and support of Marge Ross who runs the theatre and is a force of nature with a tremendous heart. I’m fortunate to live in such an awesome community.
My husband John was there by my side with whatever I needed, and my kids were too. Amanda and Tim are young adults but it’s still a shock when mom gets sick. My brother cooked for me even after I was back on my feet. Cancer can make the people around you feel so powerless, and I think that made him feel like he could do something.
My granddaughter Ava Rose Baird turned two years old in May and she is one of the reasons I fight so hard to help find a cure for breast cancer.

Study: Drug May Protect Fertility During Chemotherapy

Posted By on June 16th, 2014 at 8:46 am | 0 comments.

pregnant-womangreenResearchers at the Cleveland Clinic say they have found a drug that shows promise in protecting fertility among cancer survivors.  Goserelin, which is commonly used in hormonal therapies to treat breast and prostate cancers, is also used in fertility clinics to control ovulation.  How does it work?

According to this recent study, goserelin has been proven to prevent women from entering premature menopause that can be caused by chemotherapy.  Researchers found that women who were given goserelin injections along with chemotherapy had less ovarian failure and gave birth to more babies than women who only received chemotherapy.  Two years after starting chemotherapy, only 8% of women who received the monthly goserelin injections during chemotherapy experienced ovarian failure, compared to 22% of those with chemotherapy who did not receive the injections.  It was noted that this study only included women who had hormone-receptor-negative cancer, because many women with hormone-receptor-positive cancer typically receive the drug tamoxifen, which can cause a loss in menstruation.
Currently, the most common option for breast cancer patients to increase their chances of conceiving is to freeze their eggs, which is an invasive procedure that can cost $10,000+.  Once-a-month injections of goserelin during chemotherapy would serve as an alternative, costing about $500-$600 per shot.  Experts say, while the research shows positive results, the drug does come with side effects.  Survivors may experience a temporary postmenopausal state along with hot flashes and other symptoms.
There is some doubt among experts at the American Society of Clinical Oncology who say there is insufficient evidence that this approach is effective and “should not be relied on to preserve fertility.”
Still, scientists say they also noticed an unexpected finding of the study: women who received goserelin had a lower risk of dying after four years.   They say there is still not enough data to recommend this drug be used to treat cancer, but the results show goserelin will not worsen cancer outcomes if used to protect fertility.
To read the complete article in the New York Times, click here