Archive for the ‘Medical’ Category

Study Finds Third Gene Related to Breast Cancer

Posted By on August 15th, 2014 at 8:48 am | 0 comments.

ResearchersforwebThe two genes that have historically been linked with an increased risk of breast cancer are the BRCA1 and BRCA 2 genes.  Now, researchers at the University of Cambridge have found a third gene called PALB2 that raises the risk of breast cancer almost as much as BRCA1 and BRCA2.

Many genetic tests already check for the PALB2 gene, but it was unclear to what extent this gene increased the risk of breast cancer.  By age 70, women with BRCA1 mutations have a 50-70% chance of developing breast cancer and those with BRCA2 have a 40-60% chance.  If there is a mutation in the PALB2 gene, women have a 35% chance of developing breast cancer by age 70.

Research also found that women with the PALB2 gene have a slightly higher risk of developing triple-negative breast cancer, which is resistant to hormone treatment, more aggressive, and more likely to recur than other types of breast cancer.  Official guidelines do not recommend that women have genetic testing unless they have a family history, but the principal investigator on this new research, Dr. Marc Tischkowitz, said that, “such women should consider testing for PALB2 mutations if they are negative for BRCA1 and BRCA2.”

Read the complete New York Times article on this research: http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/07/health/gene-indicator-breast-cancer-risk.html?_r=0

Study: 3-D Mammograms More Accurate in Detecting Invasive Breast Cancer

Posted By on July 11th, 2014 at 12:51 pm | 0 comments.
3-D-Mammography-Dr.-Conant2

Dr. Emily Conant, chief of breast imaging at the University of Pennsylvania Medical Center calls 3-D mammography “a big step forward.”

According to a new study, 3-D mammograms may be better at detecting invasive tumors and avoiding false alarms than regular mammograms alone.  Researchers studied data from 13 U.S. hospitals and found that 3D screenings increased breast cancer detection rates more than 40 percent.

The findings, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, also show a 15 percent decrease in women who had to return for further testing.  Right now, 3D mammograms are not covered by most insurance companies and typically cost an extra $50 – $100.  Researchers are hoping that will change in the future.  Doctors involved with the study say, after years of a one-size-fits-all approach, these findings could lead to more tailored recommendations for women.

For the complete article in the Philadelphia Inquirer, click here.

Study: Drug May Protect Fertility During Chemotherapy

Posted By on June 16th, 2014 at 8:46 am | 0 comments.

pregnant-womangreenResearchers at the Cleveland Clinic say they have found a drug that shows promise in protecting fertility among cancer survivors.  Goserelin, which is commonly used in hormonal therapies to treat breast and prostate cancers, is also used in fertility clinics to control ovulation.  How does it work?

According to this recent study, goserelin has been proven to prevent women from entering premature menopause that can be caused by chemotherapy.  Researchers found that women who were given goserelin injections along with chemotherapy had less ovarian failure and gave birth to more babies than women who only received chemotherapy.  Two years after starting chemotherapy, only 8% of women who received the monthly goserelin injections during chemotherapy experienced ovarian failure, compared to 22% of those with chemotherapy who did not receive the injections.  It was noted that this study only included women who had hormone-receptor-negative cancer, because many women with hormone-receptor-positive cancer typically receive the drug tamoxifen, which can cause a loss in menstruation.
Currently, the most common option for breast cancer patients to increase their chances of conceiving is to freeze their eggs, which is an invasive procedure that can cost $10,000+.  Once-a-month injections of goserelin during chemotherapy would serve as an alternative, costing about $500-$600 per shot.  Experts say, while the research shows positive results, the drug does come with side effects.  Survivors may experience a temporary postmenopausal state along with hot flashes and other symptoms.
There is some doubt among experts at the American Society of Clinical Oncology who say there is insufficient evidence that this approach is effective and “should not be relied on to preserve fertility.”
Still, scientists say they also noticed an unexpected finding of the study: women who received goserelin had a lower risk of dying after four years.   They say there is still not enough data to recommend this drug be used to treat cancer, but the results show goserelin will not worsen cancer outcomes if used to protect fertility.
To read the complete article in the New York Times, click here

Targeted Breast Cancer Therapy Study Calling for Participants

Posted By on May 15th, 2014 at 10:14 am | 0 comments.

Are you currently undergoing breast cancer treatment? A new study is looking for survivors who are taking either Afinitor breast-cancer-study-for-PL Tykerb. Researchers want to learn more about the patient experience including daily nutrition and any side effects they may be noticing. Want to learn more?

GlaxoSmithKline’s Focus on the Patient team is conducting this study of oncology patients.  To be eligible, you must be:

•    Currently taking one of these medications – Afinitor or Tykerb – as part of treatment regimen for at least the past two months

•    Available to participate in on-on-one interviews on one of the following dates:  May 19, 20 or 21 to be conducted in Collegeville, PA or via Skype or telephone.

•    Willing to discuss daily nutrition and any side effects experienced as a result of this treatment as well as its effects on quality of life

Researchers are hoping to gain insight into any changes for patients related to the treatment.  If you are interested in volunteering for this study, please contact Kay Warner at kay.j.warner@gsk.com or call the PBCC at 800-377-8828.

Federal Law Allows Patient Access to Lab Test Results

Posted By on April 15th, 2014 at 8:32 am | 0 comments.

lab-results-pic-for-PLA new federal rule announced by the Department of Health and Human Services requires clinical laboratories to allow patients access to their own lab-test results upon request.  Officials say this type of information can empower patients to track their health progress and make decisions with health-care providers.  What does it mean for you?

Some physician groups including the American Medical Association expressed concern regarding how patients would react to test results without a doctor’s explanation.  The law gives labs 30 days to comply with a patient request so there is time for physicians to contact patients first.
Studies show that nearly a quarter of all abnormal lab results are not communicated to patients in a timely manner.  This may be an oversight from doctor’s offices, but patients may assume that their results are normal if they do not hear from their provider.  This new ruling is a way to decrease this occurrence and allow patients another means of accessing their test results.  The ruling does not mean that providers are no longer responsible for sharing test results with patients, it is a key that they share the results and communicate exactly what those results mean to patients and their health.

To read the complete Wall Street Journal article published on the law, click here.

Breast Cancer Researchers Need Your Help. Take Action Today!

Posted By on April 15th, 2014 at 8:32 am | 0 comments.

clinical-trials-pic-for-PLFederal funding cuts could soon shutter access to clinical trials for thousands of cancer patients across the country.  The National Cancer Institute has decided to end funding for federal-funded clinical trials in the community setting.  How can YOU help?

According to the American Society of Clinical Oncology, researchers will either be forced to shut down existing clinical trials or cancel planned new trials.  Unless the National Cancer Institute continues to fund current clinical trials and future trials, potential breakthroughs in cancer treatment may be halted.  Here’s where YOU come in.  We urge anyone passionate about finding a cure for breast cancer to contact their U.S. Senators and representatives in U.S. Congress to alert them of this important and urgent issue.  Tell them to demand continued funding for cancer clinical trials from the National Cancer Institute. Thank you for taking action with us!

To find your U.S. Representative, click here.

To contact U.S. Senator Bob Casey, click here.
To contact U.S. Senator Pat Toomey, click here.

Time to Quit? Young Smokers Linked to Increased Breast Cancer Risk

Posted By on March 14th, 2014 at 8:23 am | 0 comments.

Woman-Smoking-photoA study recently published in the journal Cancer conducted by researchers at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, found that younger women who have smoked a pack a day for the last 10 years have a 60% higher risk of developing estrogen-positive breast cancer.

In contrast, the study did not find a link between smoking and triple-negative breast cancer, which is a type of breast cancer that does not have estrogen and progesterone receptors.  The study included nearly 1,000 cancer-free women, as well as 778 people with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer and 182 people with triple-negative breast cancer between ages 20 and 44 who were diagnosed between 2004 and 2010.

Read an article on the complete study here.

Breast Cancer Mortality Rate Shows Troubling Racial Divide

Posted By on March 14th, 2014 at 8:22 am | 0 comments.

African-American-Woman-StudyNew research shows that African-American women are, on average, 40 times more likely to lose their battle with breast cancer than white women.  The startling study examined findings compiled by experts at the Sinai Urban Health Institute in Chicago and the Avon Foundation for Women.  The reason?

Researchers analyzed data from black women in 41 cities across the country with breast cancer. Researchers say the difference can be explained by lower access to health screening, lower-quality screening, less access to treatment and low-quality treatment for African-American women in urban environments.

The study also found that death rates for both black and white women with breast cancer have declined over the past 20 years, but death rates among white women saw a much more dramatic decrease over that same time period.

Read the complete article here.