Archive for December, 2013

The PBCC is hiring a Full-time Fundraising Coordinator

Posted By on December 23rd, 2013 at 2:44 pm | 21 comments.

Full-time Fundraising Coordinator Needed!

The PA Breast Cancer Coalition is seeking a highly motivated, experienced fundraiser with excellent development and proven money raising skills to work full-time in the Lebanon, PA office.

 This position provides an opportunity for an exciting, challenging and rewarding career.  This person is responsible for the overall fundraising efforts of the organization.  He/she will have the ability to organize and manage multiple fundraising projects under deadlines and interact well with all levels of staff, board and volunteers.

Duties include, but are not limited to:

   Fundraising:

  • - identify, cultivate and solicit new corporate donors
  • - identify, cultivate and solicit new major donor prospects
  • - research, apply to and submit full grant proposals to corporate, pharmaceutical and foundation funders
  • - develop and maintain relationships with large donors and foundations
  • - coordinate Conference and Home Run derby sponsorships
  • - create and execute the annual appeal and other fundraising appeals
  • - create a planned giving program

 Requirements/Qualifications

  • - Bachelor’s degree
  • - Three or more years of professional fundraising or related experience
  • - A demonstrated ability and proven track record in major and corporate gifts along with the proven record of raising money from corporations and grant makers
  • - Previous corporate, pharmaceutical and/or foundation grant writing experience
  • - Highly organized with the ability to multi-task and work productively in a team setting
  • - Willingness to travel within PA and attend occasional evening and weekend events
  • - Excellent oral and written communication skills
  • - Comfort using Microsoft Office suite

 

 Salary Range

This is a full-time, 40 hour per week position, offering a comprehensive benefits package and a competitive non-profit salary. Salary is dependent on education and experience.

 

Please submit the following to Jobs@PABreastCancer.org with “Fundraising Coordinator” in the subject line.

  • - Cover letter with information on previous fundraising successes
  • - Resume
  • - Required salary range

No phone calls please.  The PA Breast Cancer Coalition is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

 

This position is funded through October 31, 2015 with an excellent possibility of re-funding.

 

 The PA Breast Cancer Coalition (PBCC) represents, supports and serves breast cancer survivors and their families in Pennsylvania through educational programming, legislative advocacy and breast cancer research grants. The PBCC is a statewide organization with a board of directors and a network of volunteers across the state. The PBCC exists to help the 9,500 women in this state who will be diagnosed with breast cancer this year, to support the families of the 2,200 women who will die from it and to serve as a resource for the hundreds of thousands more women currently living with the disease.

President’s Corner: Commmitted to Make a Difference Every Day – Thank You Grassroots Partners!

Posted By on December 16th, 2013 at 8:30 am | 59 comments.

Pat HeadshotBy Pat Halpin-Murphy, President & FounderGP-Collage-thumbnail-2-for-web

As we enter our 21st year at the PA Breast Cancer Coalition, I’ve been thinking about what is yet to come. It’s something breast cancer survivors think about every single day. Our goal is to help them look forward to a bright future ahead. The very reason we’re able to move forward and enter this next chapter at the PBCC is because of the hard work, dedication, creativity and passion of our Grassroots Partners.

To date in 2013, more than 179 Grassroots Partner events have been held across the state raising nearly $400,000. That is absolutely incredible! From the bottom of our hearts, thank you to our Grassroots Partners, donors and volunteers for supporting the programs and mission of the PA Breast Cancer Coalition of finding a cure for breast cancer now… so our daughters won’t have to.

Click here for highlights from the 2013 Grassroots Partner events.

Interested in hosting an event for the PBCC in 2014?  Click here for more information.

Every Dollar Counts. Join our Fight to Find a Cure this Tax Season!

Posted By on December 16th, 2013 at 8:30 am | 18 comments.

Researcher-in-Lab-Wistar-Image-for-webDid you know your Pennsylvania state income tax refund can directly help to find a cure for breast cancer?  It can, and we believe it will.  Each year, the PA Breast Cancer Coalition awards grants to breast cancer researchers working to find the cause of and cure for cancer within the state through its Refunds for Research program.  How can you help?  It’s simple…

To donate,  look for Line 32 on the PA-40 tax form and list the amount of your state refund you would like to donate directly to breast cancer research.  Every penny of the money raised through Refunds for Research will fund projects in Pennsylvania.  More than $3 million has been raised since the program’s inception in 1997, but the need for funding and support is still great.  Your tax dollars today can make an impact on generations to come.  Consider donating a portion of your state income tax refund to breast cancer research.
For more information on the Refunds for Research program, click here.

Feeling Blessed: Support of Friends, Family Boost Survivor’s Journey

Posted By on December 16th, 2013 at 8:29 am | 144 comments.

Susan-Posoff-Image-2-for-webSurvivor Stories: Susan Posoff, Delaware County

I was 60 years old in January and I decided that this is the year I start taking care of myself. I found a lump in my breast in March and made an appointment to see a gynecologist. The doctor thought maybe it was a cyst … test after test, doctor after doctor. I was stoic and moving forward…

I have three daughters between the ages of 21 and 26 and I needed to be a role model for them. I was that brave warrior until after the surgery when I had time to stop and think about what had just happened. That’s when everything starting sinking in.  I work full-time doing accounts payable and payroll for the 300 employees at Waverly Heights, a senior living community. I decided I should tell them what was going on and talked with the head of human resources to put the information in my file. And then something truly amazing happened. Every morning when I came in to work, something would be at my desk. Some days it would be an inspirational message with a pink bow attached, or a flower or a plant. Whenever I turned the corner to get to my desk, I’d see the newest thing and it would just take my breath away.

Aside from work, I’m part of a new neighborhood ladies’ group. We celebrate birthdays and have “getting to know you” events. One of the ladies sent out an email to everyone in the group asking who might like to make me dinner or dessert during my treatment. At the end of the day I come home and ten women, some of whom I’ve never known before, have come to my home and made me dinner. Here I am at the end of the workday and I’m feeling wrapped in blessings. The people at work who I’ve known only a few years and the people in the neighborhood who I’ve known only a few months make this a wonderful journey.

I love being with my husband and my daughters, gardening, watching movies, and going to the beach. I love to float. I think of myself floating and I feel relaxed.

Got a Giving Spirit? You’re Probably Good-Looking, Too…

Posted By on December 16th, 2013 at 8:29 am | 100 comments.

heart-in-hands-image-for-webWhen it comes to donating your money or time to a charity of choice, do you ever wonder – what’s in it for you? According to an article published in the Wall Street Journal by Arthur Brooks, studies show that donors to charity are happier, healthier and handsome than those who choose not to give.

Researchers at the University of Chicago found that happiness and generosity go hand-in-hand.  Charitable givers are 43% more likely to say they are “very happy” when compared to nongivers.  The same goes for volunteering to nonprofits.  Scientists at the University of Buffalo studied hundreds of volunteers, finding that their charity work significantly lowered the association between stressful life events and death.

Dutch and British researchers surveyed students, showing them one of three videos featuring a handsome actor.  Those who saw the video of that actor donating to charity, the more good-looking he appeared.

According to the study, you can’t afford not to give, whether it’s a monetary donation or the donation of your time.  Take some time to support the causes you’re passionate about this holiday season.  You’ll be better off for it.

To read Arthur Brooks’ Wall Street Journal article in its entirety, click here.

Study: Many Southeastern PA Women Skipping Mammograms

Posted By on December 16th, 2013 at 8:29 am | 3533 comments.

woman-getting-mammogram-imageThe Public Health Management Corporation (PHMC) conducted an annual survey of women in Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Montgomery and Philadelphia Counties, asking how long it had been since their last clinical breast exam/mammogram.  The findings were startling…

A clinical exam is a physical examination performed by a qualified doctor or nurse that looks for lumps or changes in the breast.  A mammogram is an x-ray that will produce an image of the breast that can detect lumps.  The American Cancer Society recommends yearly mammograms starting at age 40 and clinical breast exams every three years for women in their 20s and 30s, and every year for women 40 and older.

The survey revealed that one-third of women in Southeastern Pennsylvania did not receive an annual preventative breast health screening (mammogram) in the past year.  One-third of women 18 years or older did not have a clinical breast exam in the past year.  Four in ten women ages 40 years or older did not have a mammogram in the past year.  Women 75 and older were the most likely to have missed a mammogram in the past year (44%), followed by women 60-74 (30%).
Asian women 40 years and older were more likely to have forgone a mammogram in the past year (52%), compared to White and Latina women (38%), versus Black women (30%), and women of another race/ethnicity (45%).  These statistics based on race were similar for mammograms and clinical breast exams.

Poverty level and access to care were also evaluated in this study.  Women 40 years and older who were below 100% of the Federal Poverty Level were more likely not to have had a mammogram in the past year (41%) compared to women who lived above the poverty level. (36%).   Women 18 years and older who did not have a regular source of care were twice as likely as women with a regular source of care to have forgone a breast exam in the past year.  Uninsured women 40+ were three times more likely to not have had a mammogram in the past year than those who were insured.

PHMC released this data as an annual campaign to increase awareness of breast cancer and to encourage early detection.  The results have clearly found that many women in Southeastern Pennsylvania have forgone an annual preventative breast health screening in the past year.

Click here to read the complete article on this study.

What’s for Dinner? Free Online Service Organizes Meals for Survivors

Posted By on December 16th, 2013 at 8:29 am | 30 comments.

Meal-Train-Image-2forwebWhen faced with a breast cancer diagnosis, friends or family members might ask – “How Can I Help?”  Often they offer to provide that help by cooking dinner during treatment, but it’s tough to figure out who’s bringing what and when they’re bringing it!   That’s where Meal Train comes in.  It’s a free Web site that organizes meals for friends or loved ones in need.
Here’s how it works…

MealTrain.com allows anyone to set up a free meal calendar.  In the calendar, you can log on, choose a day of the week during which you would like to make a meal.  Each participant then chooses that day, writes what meal they will be bringing so other members of the Meal Train don’t bring the same thing.  How many lasagnas can you eat in one week anyway?  Meal Train also lets you type in the survivor’s address, their favorite meals, a preferred drop-off time and any allergies their family members might have.  Friends who choose to help in other ways may opt to pass on cooking a meal and send the patient flowers or donations instead.  For more information on Meal Train, click here.